Profiles

No one braids like the Challah Prince [VIDEO]

How do you make a Challah Prince?

Start with an Israeli born in Tel Aviv named Idan Chabasov, 35. Place him in Berlin with water, flour, yeast, sugar, and egg yolks. Mix with experience as a social media marketer. Add four years in art school in Tel Aviv specializing in animation. Leave to rise, isolated, during a coronavirus pandemic, allowing ample time and space for creative experiments with challah dough. And voila, or rather, challah

‘Unorthodox’s’ Aaron Altaras: The Jewish-German Ryan Gosling?

Blame it on his multi-ethnic looks and theatrical versatility, Altaras is not pigeonholed into Jewish roles — to his delight. He was bummed the shooting of his next series in which he plays a Turkish German boxer was interrupted by the coronavirus — as was his Passover trip to Israel. He would have loved to hang with the cast of “Unorthodox,” and maybe some new fans.

Interview with Rabbi Yehuda Teichtal, Rabbi of Chabad Berlin

„Wir werden nicht untergehen“, sagt Teichtal, der 1996 „mit einem Einwegticket“ aus New York nach Berlin kam. „Wir sind froh, wir sind stolz“, gibt er zur Antwort, „sie bringen Dunkelheit, wir bringen Licht, wir werden uns nie verstecken, wir werden uns nicht unterkriegen lassen, auf keinen Fall! Never, ever, ever!“ Teichtal fordert „Nulltoleranz gegen Intoleranz“ und findet es befremdlich, „dass höchste Repräsentanten der deutschen Regierung einem Land, das Israel vernichten will, zum 40. Jahrestag der Revolution gratulieren“. Er gesteht den Deutschen ein ehrliches Bemühen um ein tolerantes Deutschland zu, sagt aber auch, dass die deutsche Gesellschaft dafür etwas tun muss: „Manchmal fehlt mir die Zivilcourage“.

Actress Rafaëlle Cohen Explores Israelis’ Love of Berlin

Of her time in the European hot spot, Cohen said, “First of all, I felt the presence of Israelis in Berlin who had true open minds. And I know there was a movement of Israelis for many years to Berlin, and it fascinated me to see that the flower that blossomed out of the crack of the war was coming back to meet its root. I found that so beautiful.”

From Williamsburg to Berlin

Upon leaving Berlin for the first time, Feldman felt unnerved and heavy. Her main association with Berlin was the Holocaust. But then, in 2014, while taking part in a documentary on women who left strict, patriarchal communities, she saw a different side of the city. A fun, creative side. A diverse side. A side she could live in.

Israeli Yehuda Poliker brings Greek-infused music to UCLA

Jewish Journal, Nov. 2, 2016 Yehuda Poliker was born in a Haifa, Israel, suburb two years after the founding of the State of Israel, to Greek Jews who survived the deportation from Thessaloniki to Auschwitz. Today, he is considered an Israeli musical icon, having reached career peaks coveted by any Israeli artist: hit singles, platinum albums, sold-out stadiums and the Lifetime Achievement Award of ACUM, Israel’s artist rights agency. Poliker, however, says he has never been motivated by accolades. “I don’t think in terms of ‘icon,’ ” he told the Jewish Journal via email, in Hebrew. “The one thing that has guided me throughout the years is a love for guitar and music. That’s what drives me. The connection music has with people moves me every time anew.” Read the rest in the Jewish Journal

Scroll to Top