Latest News

No one braids like the Challah Prince [VIDEO]

How do you make a Challah Prince?

Start with an Israeli born in Tel Aviv named Idan Chabasov, 35. Place him in Berlin with water, flour, yeast, sugar, and egg yolks. Mix with experience as a social media marketer. Add four years in art school in Tel Aviv specializing in animation. Leave to rise, isolated, during a coronavirus pandemic, allowing ample time and space for creative experiments with challah dough. And voila, or rather, challah

If Amsterdam purges prostitutes and pot shops from city center, will Jewish sites suffer?

Forward, September 30, 2020 Will the pandemic lockdown inspire Amsterdam to purge the sex and drugs from its historic core and focus more on its Jewish cultural heritage? Some natives hope so — but not necessarily the Jewish community. Like most of its European neighbors, Holland closed its borders during the coronavirus along with its schools, restaurants, museums, and its notorious tourist magnets: weed shops and legal prostitution. As soon the country re-opened in mid-June, thousands of tourists from surrounding countries poured into the compact city center. Already in July, hotel occupancy spiked up from the lockdown’s 10 percent to 50 percent. But for some locals, the post-lockdown period is not attracting the tourists they had hoped for. Read the rest on forward.com    

Corona baby boom? Not for many who want a baby the most

(April 21, 2020 / JNS) Amy Klein thought she had a hard time with infertility, having gone through 10 doctors, nine rounds of IVF in three countries and four miscarriages. But she thinks it’s nothing compared to what aspiring mothers are going through now with the coronavirus pandemic. “I can’t imagine what it’s like to put fertility treatments on hold,” says Klein, author of the new book The Trying Game: Get Through Fertility Treatment and Get Pregnant Without Losing Your Mind,” which is based on her popular “Fertility Diary” series in The New York Times. Recently named as Hadassah’s Ambassador for “Reconceiving Infertility,” their new infertility initiative, in time for National Infertility Awareness Week (April 19-25), Klein has had to push off—or completely halt—her multi-city book tour due to the pandemic, as well as even the thought of trying for a second child. “People are saying there’s going to be a baby boom because couples are at home, so what are you going to do aside from have sex? But if you’re high-risk or going through fertility treatment, or if you’ve had a baby and you know you’ll be hospitalized, you shouldn’t be taxing the health services right now,” she said. Read the rest in JNS.org

‘Unorthodox’s’ Aaron Altaras: The Jewish-German Ryan Gosling?

Blame it on his multi-ethnic looks and theatrical versatility, Altaras is not pigeonholed into Jewish roles — to his delight. He was bummed the shooting of his next series in which he plays a Turkish German boxer was interrupted by the coronavirus — as was his Passover trip to Israel. He would have loved to hang with the cast of “Unorthodox,” and maybe some new fans.

Europe on Lockdown From COVID-19

Empty toilet paper shelves, empty seats at restaurants, empty desks in schools. These emerging iconic coronavirus images have become commonplace in Europe as the continent begins nationwide lockdowns amid a rising number of COVID-19 cases. On March 14, the World Health Organization called Europe the “epicenter” of the pandemic.

Interview with Rabbi Yehuda Teichtal, Rabbi of Chabad Berlin

„Wir werden nicht untergehen“, sagt Teichtal, der 1996 „mit einem Einwegticket“ aus New York nach Berlin kam. „Wir sind froh, wir sind stolz“, gibt er zur Antwort, „sie bringen Dunkelheit, wir bringen Licht, wir werden uns nie verstecken, wir werden uns nicht unterkriegen lassen, auf keinen Fall! Never, ever, ever!“ Teichtal fordert „Nulltoleranz gegen Intoleranz“ und findet es befremdlich, „dass höchste Repräsentanten der deutschen Regierung einem Land, das Israel vernichten will, zum 40. Jahrestag der Revolution gratulieren“. Er gesteht den Deutschen ein ehrliches Bemühen um ein tolerantes Deutschland zu, sagt aber auch, dass die deutsche Gesellschaft dafür etwas tun muss: „Manchmal fehlt mir die Zivilcourage“.

Scroll to Top